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around the traps

around the traps

  • What Do Sneakers on Telephone Wires Really Mean? - The Atlantic
  • BasicsCard users buying banned cigarettes with welfare, bartering groceries for alcohol and cash - ABC News. In other words, people will buy whatever they want to buy and get around any system like this.
  • Last Call — Medium (the death of print journalism): Contrary to the contrived ignorance of media reporters, the future of the daily newspaper is one of the few certainties in the current landscape: Most of them are going away, in this decade. (If you work at a paper and you don’t know what’s happened to your own circulation or revenue in the last few years, now might be a good time to ask.) We’re late enough in the process that we can even predict the likely circumstance of its demise.
  • Wikihistory | Abyss & Apex: Take it easy on the kid, SilverFox316; everybody kills Hitler on their first trip.
  • Community TV: Malcolm Turnbull confirms licensing for stations will end in 2015 - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation): Community television will be booted off air by the Federal Government in a little over 12 months. His solution? Move online. Good thing everyone has access to a high speed national broadband network, right?
  • Big Brother, watch out!Forget about the G20 sticker blitz, another kind of revelry may be a thorny issue | Cairns Post: SIXTY-year-old grandmother Myra Gold was asleep when four police officers raided her home. They were deployed to confiscate her phone, dig through her rubbish and search her car. For stickers. Anti-G20 stickers. The woman wasn’t cooking crack, she has no connection to any terrorist organisations and she wasn’t manufacturing homemade bombs in her back yard. Stickers. ... Myra’s sticker said, “G20 benefits the 1%”.
  • On Death and iPods: A Requiem | WIRED: In all likelihood we’re not just seeing the death of the iPod Classic, but the death of the dedicated portable music player. Now it’s all phones and apps. Everything is a camera. The single-use device is gone—and with it, the very notion of cool that it once carried. The iPhone is about as subversive as a bag of potato chips, and music doesn’t define anyone anymore. Soon there will be no such thing as your music library. There will be no such thing as your music. We had it all wrong! Information doesn’t want to be free, it wants to be a commodity. It wants to be packaged into apps that differ only in terms of interface and pricing models. It wants to be rented. It wants to reveal nothing too personal, because we broadcast it to Facebook [...] I miss the time when we were still defined by our music. When our music was still our music. I miss being younger, with a head full of subversive ideas; white cables snaking down my neck, stolen songs in my pocket. There will never be an app for that. Of course there will never be an app for digging through second-hand CDs at your university markets, nor digging through crates of vinyl, nor waiting by the radio for your favourite song to come on. Perhaps every major change of technology brings these feelings on. Perhaps we curate our shared playlists with the same love and attention we used to put in to dubbing a mix tape for a friend. It just doesn't quite feel that way.

around the traps

around the traps

around the traps

photos

around the traps

  • A Beginner's Guide to Pour Over Coffee Brewing Methods | Prima Coffee. Ever wondered what the hell "V60" or "aeropress" was on the cafe menu? The results from each one tend not to be wildly different to each other, but they are very different to the usual espresso options. Well worth trying if you like a good coffee.
  • 10 things the snack food industry won’t tell you | News.com.au: Beetles aren’t the only I-dare-you-to-eat-that items you may have unknowingly noshed on. Vanilla-flavoured snacks like cookies and cakes are sometimes flavoured with castoreum, a secretion from a beaver’s behind (technically, from a sac near his anus called the castor sac) At least Snopes rates it as unlikely you'll actually run into castoreum, since it is so impractical and gross to get the raw material.
  • BMW 3D prints new thumbs for factory workers | Technology | theguardian.com
  • How not to say the wrong thing - Los Angeles Times: Here are the rules. The person in the center ring can say anything she wants to anyone, anywhere. She can kvetch and complain and whine and moan and curse the heavens and say, "Life is unfair" and "Why me?" That's the one payoff for being in the center ring. Everyone else can say those things too, but only to people in larger rings.
  • Meet the gothic bake queen whose creepy cakes are storming Instagram - People - Stylist Magazine. That's some freaky baking.
  • The age of entitlement: how wealth breeds narcissism | Anne Manne | Comment is free | theguardian.com: as people grow wealthier, they are more likely to feel entitled, to become meaner and be more likely to exploit others, even to cheat.
  • Paris Review - The Art of Fiction No. 211, William Gibson:

    But I had only been using a typewriter because I’d gotten one for free and I was poor. In 1981, most people were still writing on typewriters. There were five large businesses in Vancouver that did nothing but repair and sell typewriters. Soon there were computers, too, and it was a case of the past and the future mutually coexisting. And then the past just goes away.

    ...

    The strongest impacts of an emergent technology are always unanticipated. You can’t know what people are going to do until they get their hands on it and start using it on a daily basis, using it to make a buck and u­sing it for criminal purposes and all the different things that people do. The people who invented pagers, for instance, never imagined that they would change the shape of urban drug dealing all over the world. But pagers so completely changed drug dealing that they ultimately resulted in pay phones being removed from cities as part of a strategy to prevent them from becoming illicit drug markets. We’re increasingly aware that our society is driven by these unpredictable uses we find for the products of our imagination.

    ...

    I think the popular perception that we’re a lot like the Victorians is in large part correct. One way is that we’re all constantly in a state of ongoing t­echnoshock, without really being aware of it—it’s just become where we live. The Victorians were the first people to experience that, and I think it made them crazy in new ways. We’re still riding that wave of craziness. We’ve gotten so used to emergent technologies that we get anxious if we haven’t had one in a while.

around the traps